Black Sunshine

click a track listing to read what the Dooley Brothers have to say about the song

1. HOT ASPHALT ( 3:45) Trad.
2. THE RIVER IS WIDE (3:23 ) Trad., Arr. Nick Reynolds
3. TRAVELER'S TUNE (3:24) Joe Dooley Moon Vigil Music
4. SO DO I (3:44) Wally Page PeermusicIII, Ltd. (BMI)
5. SANTY ANNO (2:10) Trad., Arr. Dave Guard
6. BLACK SUNSHINE (4:05) Bill Dooley
7. MOUNTAIN DEW (2:34) Trad.
8. DUBLIN IN THE RARE OULD TIMES (4:28) Pete St. John
9. STAR OF THE COUNTY DOWN (3:27) Trad.
10. COME GO WITH ME (2:30) C.E. Quick
11. SUMMER WALKS (3:01) Jim Dooley Jim Jams Music
12. GOIN' HOME (3:20) Trad.
13. I’M IN LOVE AGAIN (2:31) A. Domino & D. Bartholomew

The Dooleys on "Black Sunshine"

We have put much care, heart and soul into the creation and production of this CD. It is truly a multifarious work, shaped by forty years of singing, writing, learning and performing the songs we love best, including some of our favorite original tunes. So take some time out to sit back with a cool drink or a hot espresso, and listen and enjoy. - Joe, Bill, Jim & Mike--The Dooley Brothers

HOT ASPHALT
(Traditional) When I returned from Ireland a few years ago I taught the band this humorous laborer’s song. It’s all about a lad who left the toiling of the sod to join up with the boys who make their living layin’ down the asphalt. -Bill

THE RIVER IS WIDE (Traditional, Arranged by Nick Reynolds) This is a tune from Scotland dating back to at least the 1700s. It became popular in England, Ireland and America when it was revived in the 1960s by folk groups like the Kingston Trio and the Tarriers. -Jim

TRAVELER'S TUNE (Joe Dooley) I wrote this one while traveling alone through the hills and valleys of Ireland. I set out to see the world and I ended up seeing myself as I never did before. -Joe

SO DO I (Wally Page) The words and music of this song really capture the sights and sounds of Ireland. It reminds me of the countryside of County Clare and our cousin’s farm near Tulla, a wonderful place we called home many a summer. -Bill

SANTY ANNO (Traditional, Arranged by Dave Guard)
The 1840s were a turbulent time. There was the Irish potato famine and the California gold rush. This capstan chantey, sung by the crew as they hauled in the anchor, tells the story of the men who sailed off to seek their fortune on a ship called the Santy Anno. It was found in the collected writings of a Norwegian sailor, Captain Rasmussen, by Alan Lomax and Peter Kennedy. – Mike (“They had terrible times in those days,” our mother used to say.)

BLACK SUNSHINE (Bill Dooley)
We explore the mysterious and wonderful properties of espresso coffee in this autobiographical calypso song from the abstruse mind of brother Bill. -Joe

MOUNTAIN DEW (Traditional)
Here is a whimsical number about the magical Irish moonshine known as poteen (from the ancient Roman word for “potion”). It’s said that it can start turf fires, run the tractor, grow hair, remove hair…actually, it can cure just about anything, except alcoholism (but they’re working on it!). -Mike

DUBLIN IN THE RARE OULD TIMES (Pete St. John)
A haunting ballad about a lost love and the way things used to be that has become a classic in our own day. It’s about the Dublin of old, but it could be about most any place where something, or someone, we have loved is gone. -Joe

STAR OF THE COUNTY DOWN (Traditional)
The roots of this tune are in 18th century Scotland. It (or the melody) has been used for numerous English carols and hymns. The original song has gained widespread popularity in Ireland and in Irish America, where it is often done in a rocking rakish rendition. -Jim

COME GO WITH ME (C.E. Quick)
The joy of harmony... a doo-wop number from our childhood made famous by the Del Vikings. It’s one of the first we ever sang together, long before any of our voices had changed. We still have a ball performing it today. -Bill

SUMMER WALKS (Jim Dooley)
I’ve always had a love for and fascination with autumn. The spirits and feelings of past, present and future seem to take over the land. We are reminded that life is change and we must be prepared to change with it. -Jim

GOIN' HOME (Traditional)
When the great Bohemian classical composer Antonin Dvorak visited the United States (1892-1895) he was especially impressed and influenced by the folk music and spirituals of the South. Here the largo movement of his New World symphony has been set to beautiful lyrics. -Mike

I'M IN LOVE AGAIN (Antoine Domino & Dave Bartholomew)
A salute to the great Fats Domino. One of the most heartening moments during Hurricane Katrina was when word came that the aging singer had been air-lifted to safety from his flooded New Orleans home. We learned this song as kids and have jammed on it through the years with some of our favorite musicians. –Jim